My commute to work is fairly consistent. The route doesn’t change unless roadworks or natural disasters intervene, and I have a fairly good idea of which corners, junctions and road surfaces are a bit tricky. I have to leave sufficient factor of safety in order to take evasive action when required, so I’m rarely flat out. That would be stupid (not something I’m immune to, but I do what I can most of the time).

When driving on less familiar roads, it’s important to add an additional layer of caution to avoid becoming an example/laughing stock. There is a fine example of this near work, because one particular corner seems to claim more than it’s fair share of visitors. It’s slippery when wet, accumulates a surprising amount of frost when it’s very cold, and tightens unexpectedly. It’s preceded by fast sweeping bends, so I suppose some people are lulled into thinking that their skill is sufficient to carry them through without losing much speed.

I’m sure there used to be chevron signs here, but there are only so many times that people ignore and/or crash directly in to them before the council realizes they’re more of a health hazard than a benefit. There are hence only corner/junction warning signs and road markings to implore drivers not to be daft.

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A few years back, the local farmer decided that he’d had enough of people landing in his field and being dragged out across his precious crops, so he piled up about 20 tonnes of loose dirt behind the corner. This serves the dual purpose of gently arresting wayward vehicles and closing off sight lines that may lead people to believe that the corner has a larger radius than is the case.

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Anyway, that preamble all came to naught yesterday, as someone in a new VW Golf managed to defeat almost all the obstacles placed in their path and positioned their car such that specialist equipment will be required to safely remove it. A combination of prodigious speed and foolishness resulted in the sight s you see in these images.

Almost all of the debris on the ground is from previous visitors:

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Nice work, Golf person.